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Premier League announces partnership with Stonewall

The Premier League and Stonewall have today announced a three-year partnership to help further promote LGBT equality in football. The League and its clubs will work with Stonewall to encourage LGBT people to get involved in the sport – whether playing, supporting a club, or working in an off-pitch role – and to improve the experience of the LGBT community when they do so. Through the partnership, the Premier League will join Stonewall’s Global Diversity Champions programme, becoming one of 750 organisations that works to improve the lives of the LGBT community in the UK and internationally. This will include the League taking steps to ensure it provides an inclusive environment for LGBT people it employs and engages with. A significant part of the partnership will include work to address unacceptable language and homophobic abuse, whether in stadiums or on social media. This will focus on improved reporting measures, staff training and other programmes that will see the League use the power of football, and its significant reach, to promote LGBT fan groups. In an effort to ensure LGBT young people feel welcome and included across all aspects of the sport, Stonewall and the Premier League will work closely with clubs to ensure that equality and diversity are key parts of the many programmes they run in communities across the country. http://www.stonewall.org.uk/news/premier-league-announces-partnership-stonewall

12/01/2018


May’s reshuffle shows diversity and equality are not priorities

Interesting article from the FT: regarding the PrimeMinisters Cabinet reshuffle. The UK prime minister’s cabinet reshuffle this week was billed as creating a more diverse and thus more representative top political team. But although younger female politicians and some with ethnic minority backgrounds replaced some of the older white men holding junior ministerial roles, the make-up of the cabinet barely shifted.Excluding Theresa May, the average age of its members is 51, down from 52 before the reshuffle. Just five of her 22 ministers are female and only one is from a black or ethnic minority background, the same as before. A set of bio pics posted on the BBC says it all really, and gives the lie to Mrs May’s claims that her reshuffle delivered a government which looks “more like the country it serves”.Another — less remarked-upon — appointment tells a similar story. Justine Greening, as well as education secretary, was also minister for women and equalities, a post which, since its creation under Tony Blair, has generally been combined with a cabinet position. As a result, the ministerial role has shifted department depending on which of the relatively few women in cabinet took on the job. Its policy unit, the Government Equalities Office, established a decade later in 2007, has moved department five times since.Presumably, the prime minister expected the job to go with Ms Greening when she went to the Department of Work and Pensions, a move which she refused. The government appears to have scrambled for a solution and, late on Tuesday, announced that the women and equalities portfolio would now be given to the home secretary, Amber Rudd.The decision poses a number of questions. Ms Rudd already has a rather demanding day job and, while the home secretary’s voice is the second-most powerful female one in cabinet after the prime minister’s, it seems unlikely that she will have the bandwidth to give the equalities role real attention. If she were to be given proper support that could make a difference but, as of Tuesday, this did not seem to be forthcoming.The role attracts no extra pay, and the government said on Tuesday that there would be no junior Home Office ministers appointed to help out. Anne Milton, who played that part under Ms Greening at the Department of Education, may continue in her job as minister for women, but would then presumably report to the head of the Home Office, a recipe for bureaucratic gridlock.The whole endeavour appears under-resourced in any case. Probably the GEO’s most important and high-profile project at the moment is the government’s gender pay gap reporting initiative, which requires employers to register their data on an official portal. Employers must do so by early April, but so far only a tiny fraction has done so. The GEO’s budget peaked at £76m in 2010-11, but has roughly halved since and the inaccuracies on the portal — still running in its beta version — suggest its resources are under pressure. As is morale.Its highly regarded head, Helene Reardon-Bond, was replaced last July, and there are reports of considerable turnover in the more junior ranks. The GEO has not had a dedicated spokesperson for several months. The endless chopping and changing in personnel, minister, leadership and department is conducive neither to maintaining the quality of the GEO’s work nor the effective achievement of its tasks.Ms Rudd’s appointment and its consequences for the government’s work on equality — allied to a cabinet that was meant to look more up-to-date but simply looks like more of the same — also send a clear message about this government’s commitment. It is understandable that, with Brexit looming, other policy priorities predominate, but diversity is definitely not at the top of the list.sarah.gordon@ft.com https://tinyurl.com/yay7n56j

11/01/2018


If diversity and compassion make the British Army stronger, we should embrace them

Lots of media coverage regarding the British Army's diversity policies

10/01/2018


points of interest

  1. Premier League announces partnership with Stonewall

    12/01/2018

    The Premier League and Stonewall have today announced a three-year partnership to...more

  2. May’s reshuffle shows diversity and equality are not priorities

    11/01/2018

    Interesting article from the FT: regarding the PrimeMinisters Cabinet reshuffle. The UK...more

  3. If diversity and compassion make the British Army stronger, we should embrace them

    10/01/2018

    Lots of media coverage regarding the British Army's diversity policies...more



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